Download your map for Biketoberfest presented by The Charlotte Knights

Before you head off on your Biketoberfest presented by The Charlotte Knights urban adventure on October 14th, make sure you have the route map on your phone!  This customized Google Map will give you turn by turn directions in case you get lost along the way. You can download the map for offline use, too!  Continue reading

Why Monday's CATS bus network change is big news for riders

On Monday October 1, the Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) made changes to 21 bus routes. In fact, this is the biggest structural change to the bus network in years! Our program director Meg Fencil reviews what the changes mean for riders, and how her own daily commute experience on Route 16 changed on Monday. Following the Envision My Ride bus network redesign on Oct 1, some stops like this one on S Tryon are being used more. This post shares my observations during the first few days of the bus network redesign. It's been only 48 hours since the changes went into effect early Monday morning, and it will take weeks for reliable ridership trends to be defined. We'll share those trends just as soon as we can! Every changed route will have its own ridership patterns and needs for adjustment. In the meantime, here's what I've seen so far from personal experience riding one of those routes: the 16 South Tryon.  Continue reading

Charlotte residents take to the streets for Open Streets 704

Thousands of people filled the streets on Sunday, September 30th for Open Streets 704!  We hope you had a chance to participate in this fun people-powered event that closed 4 miles of streets from Charlotte’s South End to West End.  If you missed it, Open Streets 704 happens bi-annually, once in the spring and once in the fall, so you’ll get another chance. Continue reading

From parking spaces to pop-up parks

On Friday, September 21st, Sustain Charlotte partnered with LS3P to participate in PARK(ing) day, an annual, global event where participants temporarily transform parking spaces into pop-up parks. The mission of PARK(ing) Day is to call attention to the need for more urban open space, to generate critical debate around how public space is created and allocated, and to improve the quality of our urban human habitat. The project began in 2005 when Rebar, a San Francisco art and design studio, converted a single metered parking space into a temporary public park in downtown San Francisco. Since 2005, PARK(ing) Day has evolved into a global movement, with organizations and individuals creating new forms of temporary public space in urban contexts around the world. Continue reading

Making strides toward safer streets in Charlotte

The Charlotte City Council's Transportation and Planning Committee met for their September meeting, where they discussed the City's new visioning process to develop a Comprehensive Plan, improvements to make streets safer for pedestrians and cyclists, and the e-scooter program. Continue reading

The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities: Local Air Quality

This is the fifth article in our series of weekly blog posts called "The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities". For this series, we are asking local experts three questions to give you a quick overview of recent local trends and solutions with respect to a range of important issues that affect our community's sustainability. This week’s topic is air quality, and our featured experts are June Blotnick, Executive Director of Clean Air Carolina, and Terry Lansdell, Executive Director of BikeWalk NC. Continue reading

The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities: Local Food

This is the seventh article in our 8-part series of weekly blog posts called "The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities". For this series, we are asking local experts three questions to give you a quick overview of recent local trends and solutions with respect to a range of important issues that affect our community's sustainability. This week’s topic is local food, and our featured expert is Erin Hostetler, Board Member for the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Food Policy Council. Continue reading

"Growing" our local food systems

You may be familiar with your local farmers market, or try to buy locally grown foods when you grocery shop. But do you know how our Charlotte-regional food economy stacks up against other peer regions? On September 12th, over 100 people joined us at The Barrel Room at Catawba Brewing to learn about local foods and how they can make a difference. We were excited to have representatives from Carolina Farm Trust, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Food Policy Council, and Rivendell Farms in the room to talk to people about the work they’re doing, in addition to our presenter, Tom Warshauer, Assistant Director of Community Engagement for the City of Charlotte. Continue reading

Charlotte City Council Environment Committee Lays Out Timeline And Engagement Process For Strategic Energy Action Plan

At their September 10th meeting, the Charlotte City Council Environment Committee received an update on the Strategic Energy Action Plan (SEAP) that outlined the timeline and stakeholder engagement process. Continue reading

Diving Into Senior Mobility in Charlotte

Many senior adults in Charlotte struggle to maintain their mobility as they age, often resulting in social isolation and inability to meet daily needs. The gaps in Charlotte’s transportation network and barriers to mobility for seniors, particularly for those seniors who rarely leave their homes, are not fully understood. Thanks to the generous support of Southminster, Sustain Charlotte partnered with residents in four neighborhoods to evaluate a wide variety of factors that may limit senior mobility including health, safety, infrastructure, personal finances, knowledge of transportation options, comfort level using various transportation modes, and desire to maintain personal mobility. The goal was to not only identify specific mobility challenges that prevent Charlotte seniors from traveling to their desired daily destinations, but to also envision how the mobility needs of senior residents could be addressed. In this way, this is both a research and an action project with the project’s approach and outcomes being replicable in other Charlotte neighborhoods in the future. Sustain Charlotte worked with residents in Lincoln Heights, Hidden Valley, Washington Heights, University Park, and the West Blvd corridor, hosting workshops and conducting door-to-door surveying to identify specific senior mobility challenges. Continue reading