Advocates pack the room to discuss advancing cycling in Charlotte

Thanks to you, we had the biggest turn out to date for a Shifting Gears workshop! On Thursday, August 23rd, close to 70 people come out to Birdsong Brewing for an evening of bikes and fun! The goal for every Shifting Gears public action workshop is for each attendee to leave with one action that they can undertake to help advance biking in Charlotte and one community contact to help them along the way.  These actions can be anything from biking to work regularly, trying dockless bikeshare for the first time, or volunteering. Whether interested in biking but haven’t yet started, a weekend warrior, or a daily bike commuter -- everyone has a part to play in helping realize our City’s new vision for bicycling in Charlotte. Continue reading

Sustain Charlotte stands up against changes to National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations

Sustain Charlotte has joined dozens of organizations based in North Carolina in submitting a letter to the federal Council on Environmental Quality in opposition to a proposed overhaul of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations. Continue reading

The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities: Local Energy

This is the sixth article in our 8-part series of weekly blog posts called "The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities". For this series, we are asking local experts three questions to give you a quick overview of recent local trends and solutions with respect to a range of important issues that affect our community's sustainability. This week’s topic is energy, and our featured experts are Mike Davis, Director of Membership for the NC Sustainable Energy Association, and Joel Olsen, CEO of O2 emc.  Continue reading

Transit Equity and the Road to Vision Zero

Most people who ride transit for daily transportation reach their stops by walking. But how safe is that walk (or bike ride) to and from transit? And how many people who might want to ride transit choose not to because they can't reach stops safely? In this latest blog post on transit equity, we explore how Charlotte is using a Vision Zero approach to work towards eliminating traffic-related deaths and severe injuries. Pedestrians and cyclists are the most vulnerable users of streets. (image: CDOT) Continue reading

The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities: Local Waste Management

This is the fifth article in our 8-part series of weekly blog posts called "The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities". For this series, we are asking local experts three questions to give you a quick overview of recent local trends and solutions with respect to a range of important issues that affect our community's sustainability. This week’s topic is solid waste, and our featured experts are Victoria O. Johnson, Director of Solid Waste Services for the City of Charlotte, and Jeffrey Smithberger, Director of Solid Waste Management for Mecklenburg County. Continue reading

Valuing seniors, building community

We’re all either seniors, or will be seniors one day. An often overlooked facet of sustainability is how to make our communities accessible, open, and appreciative to all ages, including older residents. That’s why we started our Senior Mobility Project, and why we chose to make age-inclusive communities the theme of our August Grow Smart CLT. From millennials to boomers, 70 people gathered at The Barrel Room at Catawba Brewing Company to participate in a discussion about building age-friendly communities. Continue reading

Transit Equity: More than bus stops

You've likely been hearing a lot about equity in the local news lately. There's been a lot of attention focused on how equity is affected by affordable housing, quality of schools, gentrification, and a host of other very real and pressing social issues. In today's blog post we examine how access, or lack of access, to high-quality public transit affects equity.  TransitCenter's new Inclusive Transit: Advancing Equity Through Improved Access & Opportunity report sums it up well: "Allowing people to meet these [day-to-day transportation] needs creates long-term economic opportunities and helps people escape poverty. In addition to transit’s well documented environmental and economic benefits, public transportation can be a powerful tool to advance racial equity and social justice in American cities." Continue reading

The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities: Local Land Use

This is the fourth article in our 8-part series of weekly blog posts called "The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities". For this series, we are asking local experts three questions to give you a quick overview of recent local trends and solutions with respect to a range of important issues that affect our community's sustainability. This week’s topic is land use, and our two featured experts are John Komisin and David Walters.                                                                                                 John Komisin                      David Walters Continue reading

The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities: Local Parks + Green Space

This is the third article in our 8-part series of weekly blog posts called "The Good, the Bad, the Possibilities". For this series, we are asking local experts three questions to give you a quick overview of recent local trends and solutions with respect to a range of important issues that affect our community's sustainability. This week’s topic is parks and green space, and our featured expert is Lee Jones, Director of Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation. Continue reading

Moving in the Right Direction: Sustainable Transportation with YouthQuake!

Summer in North Carolina is in full swing: long sunny days, temperatures in the ‘80s, and humidity even higher… oh, and for those of us at Sustain Charlotte, the chance to go back to summer camp! On Thursday, July 19th, we hosted a Sustainable Transportation Fair in partnership with the Progressive Baptist Church’s summer camp, YouthQuake!. We invited governmental departments and nonprofits from all over the city to Arbor Glen Outreach Center, to teach the campers about how transportation choices affect their health, safety, and community. Continue reading